Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Interview with @KPKollenborn for How the Water Falls



Although I've been writing since childhood, I have a BA in history. I love studying history as much as wanting to evoke stories. I like to believe that after decades worth of introspection we have learned to value our lessons, and the best way to recite our lessons are through storytelling. That's why I love history: To learn. To question. To redeem our humanity. Submitting to a moment in time allows us to remember, or to muse even, our society's past. Although writing can educate as well as entertain, yet what makes art incredibly amazing, to that of paintings, photographs, and music, it transposes emotion into another form of humanity, and therefore, it is our humanity which keeps all of us striving for an improved future.

I am fortunate to have been trained by one the top ten writing teachers in the US, the late Leonard Bishop, and author of 'Dare to be a Great Writer.' I owe my love of writing to him. In addition to writing, I draw, paint, create graphic design, and am an amateur photographer.


1. At any given time do you work on only one story at a time and maybe plot out the next one or are there many ideas racing around your head?
I try to keep focus by writing on one story at a time, although smaller stories have unexpectedly popped out and have become incomplete projects as a result.  But I do keep mental notes of future stories in the back of my mind that can ferment for years before I decide to commit.

2. Is there a genre you haven't written in but would like to? Or wish you could write in?
I enjoy watching science fiction, although can’t write in that that genre.  I have tried on several occasions and have felt like wearing clothes that were two sizes too small.  Just not a good fit.

3. Do you add an element of romantic suspense in your stories?
With my second novel, How the Water Falls, yes, because that was an easy fit.  Already dealing with the backdrop of South Africa’s apartheid, and establishing two of the characters with different backgrounds and political beliefs, it was as if the tension and suspense was outlined for me.

4. Say you have unlimited funds: What kind of writing office/cottage would you create for yourself?
With unlimited funds, I would put up Fort Knox so I could have complete privacy and no distractions!

5. If you could turn your novel into a TV show, which novel or series would you do? Where would it be set? Network TV (ABC, NBC, CBS), Cable (AMC, BBC, Lifetime) or Premium Cable (HBO, Showtime, Starz)? 
It would either be HBO or Showtime based on the violent and sexual content of the book without censorship, while maintaining the integrity of a strong plot and strong characters.

6. Finally, tell us about your latest release!
On the fringes of a civil war arise a kaleidoscope of stories of abuse, power, betrayal, sex, love, and absolution, all united by the failings of a dying government. Set in the backdrop during the last years of South Africa's apartheid, How the Water Falls is a psychological thriller that unfolds the truth and deception of the system’s victims, perpetrators, and unlikely heroes. 

The two main characters, one white, Joanne– a reporter, the other black, Lena– a banned activist, have their lives continuously overlap through the people they know during a thirteen-year period and eventually become friends as a result of their interviews together. Joanne personifies the need to question and investigate apartheid’s corruption from a white person’s perspective. 

Although her intentions begin with idealism, no matter how na├»ve, as the years pass while the system is failing, she crosses the threshold of what it means to be caught up inside the belly of the beast, especially after crossing paths with the Borghost brothers. Lena, who is inspired by her predecessors, such as Steve Biko and Nelson Mandela, is among the minority of black women to peacefully battle for equality, even if her struggle is indicative of sacrificing her health and safety. 

Hans Borghost is Johannesburg’s commissioner of police who, like all those before, had a military background before pursuing a law enforcement career. Violent, manipulative, and controlling, he incarnates the image of South Africa’s perpetrators. Jared Borghost is the younger brother of Hans and, like his brother, has a military background, but unlike Hans, he internally combats between his sense of duty and morality. His inconsistency indicates a conscience that leaves one to ponder whether Jared is either a perpetrator, victim, or both. 

As his surname suggests, Bor-GHOST represents the “ghosts” that haunt the family’s past. Many other characters play the roles of spies, freedom fighters, lovers, adversaries, and supporters.  This novel is as complex as apartheid was itself, unlacing fabrics of each character’s life to merge into a catalyst downfall. 

The question of who will survive this downfall will suffice in the courts of truth and reconciliation and whether love is strong enough to preserve peace.

Where to Buy: Amazon

Excerpt:

Gently pressing his hand for support, she said, “Good luck, Rrobbie. I’m surre you will find fulfillment dere.”

“So does my wife!” he laughed again. “She ‘as thrreatened to find anotha ‘usband if I don’t stop complaining so much.” Catching his breath, he announced, “So, Lena, shall we begin?”

He stepped back to the edge of the sidewalk and started to snap shots. Several people, who were white, walked by Lena and the other two protesters, and only glanced at the signs. Robbie took the photos of the passersby glancing at the signs. Although not stopping, they were at least noticing the existence of the signs. Robert eased his way around to photograph the two others who were dressed in their fine work attire appropriate for retail sales. Twenty minutes into the silent protest, the owner of the shoe store swung the entrance of the door open. In his early forties, wearing a suit and tie, he angrily pointed at his employee.

“What is the meaning of this, Dingane?” he demanded.

“Rread de sign, baas,” he calmly replied, as if softly blowing a toy boat down the stream.

Glaring at Robert, he turned his pointing finger into his direction. “You there!” he cried. “Stop taking photos! You have no right to take photos in front of my place of business!”

Robert removed his press card from his jacket to show the store owner.

“This is public prroperty,” Robert defended smoothly. “As a member of the prress, I ‘ave the rright to be ‘ere. You can call the police if you like, but I tell you, they cannot do anything to stop me.”

The owner blinked as if he had been slapped in the face. Then turning to his employee, he ranted, “Dingane, get back inside before I fire you! You know very well I pay you the going rate for kaffirs!”

K.P. Kollenborn will be awarding a print copy of the book to a randomly drawn winner via rafflecopter during the tour.
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Goddess Fish Blog Tour Partner

Goddess Fish Blog Tour Partner
Goddess Fish Blog Tour Partner